Fifty children and young adults participate in adolescent melanoma screening event, a first in Harford County

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Caiden Coleman, 10, participates in an adolescent melanoma screening by Dr. Dennis Kurgansky, a board certified dermatologist, at the Kaufman Cancer Center at University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air May 20. The afternoon screening event was held by University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health and the Claire Marie Foundation. (Photo Courtesy of Sarah Coleman)

The Kaufman Cancer Center at University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Medical Center hosted an adolescent melanoma screening event and saw 50 young people, sending nine for further evaluation. Here are the details provided:

University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health, Claire Marie Foundation Host Adolescent Melanoma Screening Event

Fifty children and young adults participate in screening event, a first in Harford County

 

Fifty children and young adults, ranging in age from 8-30, participated in an adolescent melanoma screening May 20 at the Kaufman Cancer Center at University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air.

 

The screenings were held by University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health and Claire Marie Foundation. The screening was held in May, recognized as Sun Safety Month. It was the first screening event of its kind in Harford County.

 

Board certified dermatologists Dr. Jennifer Cooper and Dr. Dennis Kurgansky conducted the four-hour screenings. Of the 50 who participated in the screening, nine were found to need further evaluation or biopsy referrals.

Adolescent melanoma is a cancer that results from hormones and exposure to the sun. Typically found on a lower extremity, adolescent melanoma usually becomes noticeable as a child approaches or reaches puberty. Pregnant women are also susceptible to adolescent melanoma as are those with thyroid issues. Early detection is important, and the cancer is 90 percent curable.

 

“We are so pleased with how many people came to the adolescent melanoma screening. We plan to make this screening an annual event,” said Vickie Ensor Bands, director of community outreach and health improvement for University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health. “It is so important for children and young adults to be screened. Adolescent melanoma is the number one cancer that kills women ages 25-30. Early detection is a way to keep adolescent melanoma from taking lives.”

 

The Claire Marie Foundation is a nonprofit dedicated to fighting adolescent and young adult melanoma through awareness, education and prevention. It was founded by Marianne Bannister and her husband, Rocky Wagonhurst, both well-known media professionals in Baltimore, after the passing of their daughter, Claire Marie, from adolescent melanoma. The foundation holds screening days and other events throughout the year. For more information about the foundation, visit clairemariefoundation.org.