University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health receives American Heart Association recognition

0
10

The University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health (UM UCH) received Gold recognition from the American Heart Association. Here are the details provided:

UM Upper Chesapeake Health Receives Gold Recognition on the American Heart Association’s Workplace Health Achievement Index

Bel Air, Md., — January 15, 2020 — University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health (UM UCH) received Gold recognition on the American Heart Association’s Workplace Health Achievement Index. UM UCH has received recognition from the American Heart Association for various programs yearly since 2012.

The American Heart Association’s Workplace Health Achievement Index recognizes more than 900 organizations across the United States for investing in the health of their workforce and workplace. Building a workplace culture of health, including a healthy workplace environment, can lead to increased productivity, less absenteeism and reduced cost growth trend in health expenditure.

The achievement index is a web-based portal that fuses health content, personal health data and consumer engagement opportunities that evaluate the overall quality and comprehensiveness of their workplace health programs. Of the organizations that completed the Index assessment, 27 percent received Gold recognition, 26 percent Silver and 29 percent Bronze. Recognition designations are determined by data submitted, as well as the overall heart health score of their employees.

“A healthy workplace culture is important for all organizations but particularly for one that focuses on health care,” said Lyle E. Sheldon, FACHE, president/CEO of University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health. “It is truly an honor to be recognized with Gold recognition by the American Heart Association’s Workplace Health Achievement Index.”

The achievement index was created in 2016 by the American Heart Association’s CEO Roundtable–a leadership collaborative that has grown to more than 45 members who collectively represent more than 10 million employees and their family members—to implement evidence-based approaches to workplace health, empowering employees and building stronger corporate cultures.

The index also integrates Life’s Simple 7®,the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal cardiovascular health based on seven risk factors, into the scoring process. Life’s Simple 7® includes smoking status, physical activity, weight, diet, blood glucose, cholesterol and blood pressure.

For more information about the American Heart Association’s Workplace Health Achievement Index , visit www.heart.org/workplacehealth.